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YouTube Couple Face Backlash after Revealing They Rehomed Adopted Son

Parenting YouTube couple Myka and James Stauffer are facing backlash after revealing they rehomed their special needs adopted son. Angry commenters have written that the couple only adopted a son to monetize and gain clout for their YouTube channels, which currently have 300,000 and 700,000 followers.
The Stauffers shared their adoption journey beginning in 2016, revealing that their adopted son had a brain tumor and damage, suffered a stroke in utero, had sensory processing disorder and autism. When followers began voice concerns after noticing that the four-year-old wasn’t showing up in any new videos, the Stauffers, parents to four other biological children, broke down in a video on Tuesday explaining their decision to re-home the boy.
Myka revealed that even though the couple tried their hardest to care for the child, he had more special needs than they were made aware of. She says she feels like a failure as a mother for re-homing her adopted son, even though medical professionals felt the child would be a better bit for another family.
While critics have said the couple “exploited” the child’s circumstances to monetize their YouTube channel, the Stauffers do have many supporting their very difficult decision. YouTube commenters wrote “I can see the heartbreak in this family’s face” and “I can’t imagine how difficult this was for you.”
A 2010 University of Minnesota study found that between 6-11% of all adoptions are disrupted before they are finalized and up to 7% are disrupted after the adoption. There is currently a petition at Change.org asking YouTube to demonetize all Stauffer videos showing the young boy.
Does it seem like the four-year-old boy’s story was used to gain cash and followers? Do you sympathize with the Stauffers?
Parenting YouTube couple Myka and James Stauffer are facing backlash after revealing they rehomed their special needs adopted son. Angry commenters have written that the couple only adopted a son to monetize and gain clout for their YouTube channels, which currently have 300,000 and 700,000 followers.
The Stauffers shared their adoption journey beginning in 2016, revealing that their adopted son had a brain tumor and damage, suffered a stroke in utero, had sensory processing disorder and autism. When followers began voice concerns after noticing that the four-year-old wasn’t showing up in any new videos, the Stauffers, parents to four other biological children, broke down in a video on Tuesday explaining their decision to re-home the boy.
Myka revealed that even though the couple tried their hardest to care for the child, he had more special needs than they were made aware of. She says she feels like a failure as a mother for re-homing her adopted son, even though medical professionals felt the child would be a better bit for another family.
While critics have said the couple “exploited” the child’s circumstances to monetize their YouTube channel, the Stauffers do have many supporting their very difficult decision. YouTube commenters wrote “I can see the heartbreak in this family’s face” and “I can’t imagine how difficult this was for you.”
A 2010 University of Minnesota study found that between 6-11% of all adoptions are disrupted before they are finalized and up to 7% are disrupted after the adoption. There is currently a petition at Change.org asking YouTube to demonetize all Stauffer videos showing the young boy.
Does it seem like the four-year-old boy’s story was used to gain cash and followers? Do you sympathize with the Stauffers?
Parenting YouTube couple Myka and James Stauffer are facing backlash after revealing they rehomed their special needs adopted son. Angry commenters have written that the couple only adopted a son to monetize and gain clout for their YouTube channels, which currently have 300,000 and 700,000 followers.
The Stauffers shared their adoption journey beginning in 2016, revealing that their adopted son had a brain tumor and damage, suffered a stroke in utero, had sensory processing disorder and autism. When followers began voice concerns after noticing that the four-year-old wasn’t showing up in any new videos, the Stauffers, parents to four other biological children, broke down in a video on Tuesday explaining their decision to re-home the boy.
Myka revealed that even though the couple tried their hardest to care for the child, he had more special needs than they were made aware of. She says she feels like a failure as a mother for re-homing her adopted son, even though medical professionals felt the child would be a better bit for another family.
While critics have said the couple “exploited” the child’s circumstances to monetize their YouTube channel, the Stauffers do have many supporting their very difficult decision. YouTube commenters wrote “I can see the heartbreak in this family’s face” and “I can’t imagine how difficult this was for you.”
A 2010 University of Minnesota study found that between 6-11% of all adoptions are disrupted before they are finalized and up to 7% are disrupted after the adoption. There is currently a petition at Change.org asking YouTube to demonetize all Stauffer videos showing the young boy.

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